I wasn’t looking for compliments

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I saw this Peanuts comic strip over the weekend and I wish I had seen it and copied it a few months back. You see I approached the head of one of the syndicates, the top guy, and I asked him to look at my work. I felt that it was not getting seen because they would reject my stuff so fast, you know, not even having time to look at it.

His response was, “I’ll be glad to look at your work, but I know you’re looking for compliments and that’s not what I’ll do.”

I was sort of dumbstruck and I would have sent this comic strip in response if I had known about it at the time. I was sending him my work for publication, not to get accolades.

Needless to say, he didn’t like my work, he put it down in not so many words and that was that. That’s the day I gave up on syndicates and decided to just go it alone.

I know it’s been a long time coming, but I will be publishing my Tomversation comic strip/panel soon.

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Enjoying the Beaux Arts Festival

The Beaux Arts Festival is in town this weekend. Starting in January a whole bunch of art festivals take over the South Florida area. It’s a lot of the same artists that make the circuit and go from show to show, so there is not much new art to see, but it’s fun to be out and for my friends and me it’s a lot about the food.

The Beaux Arts Festival is a yearly event benefit for the Lowe Art Museum on the University of Miami campus. This is

the 67th year.

Dale Messick and Brenda Starr featured at Society of Illustrators gallery

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The Art of Dale Messick – the Brenda Starr cartoonist, will be on display at the Society of Illustrators in NY from January 3 to March 23, 2019.

I won’t be in NY during this period, but would have loved to see the work up close. As a kid, I would read all of the comics in the NY Daily News, including Brenda Starr. I used to like the way it was drawn as well as the stories.

The Society of Illustrators is a small gallery/museum at 128 East 63rd Street, a great place but easy to miss.

The first time I went, I was meeting my cousin there, it was raining and I knew the general area, but couldn’t find the museum. I stood under a red awning to get out of the rain and was looking around the area, wondering, “Where is this place?” only to turn around and realize the awning I was standing under was the awning to the Society of Illustrators entrance!

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Saturday at Art Miami

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Went to Art Miami on Saturday with a friend, one of the Art Basel satellite shows on the Miami side of the causeway – Basel is on the other side, in Miami Beach.

Saw lots of people we knew, it’s a big community affair and it’s usually that way.

Lots of famous people attend, but the only one I spotted was Nicole Scherzinger, all dolled up in a fluffy fur coat, just as you would expect to see her.

Warhol at the Whitney

I finally got around to going to the new Whitney Museum in NYC. They have an Andy Warhol exhibit going on, which I love. But Andy was so prolific, that I have seen so much of his work before in different museums and venues. 

Ironically, I ended up at Union Square after leaving the Whitney – it’s sort of right down 14th Street from one place to the other and while there, I checked out the old Factorys – Andy’s studios. 

Two are at Union Square, I believe there were four in all. There is one at 33 Union Square West and another a block or so away at 860 Broadway, which covered the 1960s and 1970s, up until 1984, I believe for Warhol.

When I stand outside those buildings, I stare at the front entrances and try to picture all the people that went in and out at those very locations. I never did hang out at these places when it was the Factorys all those years ago. I’m thinking I could have hung out right outside and seen who came and went, maybe look like a lost kid hanging out there and be invited inside.

I usually get Mr. Softee right outside the 33 Union Square West location now, there’s usually a truck right on that corner in the summer.

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Thanks to the Durrells and Anthony Bourdain, I have wanderlust

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The Durrells – in Corfu

I’m feeling wanderlust. I was watching the Durrells in Corfu the other night and I really would love to live like them. If you haven’t seen it, it’s a PBS show, it’s a true story about a mother and her four children who move from England to Greece in the 1930s after the father passes away. The kids are about 11 to 22 years of age.

The surroundings and town are so beautiful. They live in a big old house at the water’s edge, surrounded by the sea and beautiful mountains and they are ensconced with the locals who become their friends.

Each of the kids has his own thing going on from the youngest one loving and collecting animals to the oldest being a writer who is trying to be a world traveler. It’s excellent.

Right after the Durrell’s I turned to Anthony Bourdain’s Parts Unknown and it was about West Texas, which according to this episode is completely different than I thought. The people are very accepting, they love their Mexican neighbors across the river, they speak Spanish, out of respect, as one man put it, they eat Spanish food and there is a large Mexican influence, they know that their land was once Mexican land, and oh yea –  they don’t want a border wall. This is one of the best episodes I’ve ever seen. It may be posted here on the Parts Unknown website by now, worth a look.

I am at the point in my life where I feel like selling all my possessions and just traveling and cartooning along the way, incorporating the locations in my work. When I think of the southwest, I think of George Herriman who had a very big connection to that area, as you can see in Krazy Kat.

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Tiny Doors Atlanta

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Tiny door in a tree trunk. Photos courtesy Tiny Doors Atlanta

I saw this story on tv about Tiny Doors Atlanta. It’s an art project where artist Karen Anderson creates and installs tiny doors throughout the city. It’s free art in public spaces, free tiny art.

People love them and interact with them. The doors are 7 inches tall and they are placed in strategic places throughout Atlanta. They’re placed anywhere, as part of trees, walls, houses, just about anywhere.

The interesting part is that only one of the doors opens at this time. The goal is to create a sense of wonderment and imagination, but the doors don’t open.

All the door locations are in public areas and free to visit. One of my favorites is built into a tree trunk.

I’ve been a promoter of the little free library project for awhile and now love the tiny door concept.

The website is here: https://tinydoorsatl.com/
The Instagram page with over 100,000 followers is here: https://www.instagram.com/tinydoorsatl/

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