Supporting Eaten Fish

In 2013 a 21 year old Iranian cartoonist named Ali arrived in Australia The Australian government put him in a detention camp. He’s been in a detention camp ever since.

Ali cartoons under the name Eaten Fish. Cartoonists, starting in Australia, and now all over the world have been drawing fish cartoons and posting them on social media in the hopes of drawing attention to the detention.

Australia detains people who seek asylum if they arrive by boat. Talk about wet foot, dry foot. Ali is detained on Manus Island. Ali’s health is failing and people all over the world are asking for his freedom.

I have collected some of the EatenFish comics that have been making the rounds.

Cartoonists Rights Network International (CRNI) writes: “It is with profound alarm and sadness that [we] learn that our friend and colleague, cartoonist Mr. Eaten Fish, currently held in an Australian refugee rendition camp in Papua New Guinea has decided to undertake a hunger strike. He is a man who has given up hope, cannot struggle any longer, cannot face the future that is being forced on him, and he would rather die than submit to the indignities of further inhuman treatment.”

The Australian government has been petitioned many times both from within Australia and internationally asking that Eaten Fish be brought to Australia for medical treatment.

Cartoonists feel that they can bring awareness to the issue with a media campaign by posting images of fish with the hashtags “AddAFish #EatenFish

More in this issue here.

On the whole, I’d like to be cartooning in Hoboken!

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Lower Manhattan seen from the Hoboken, NJ waterfront.

I completed a bunch of 10 With Tom interviews with new cartoonists who I admire. They were all gracious and humble. Very nice people. The interviews will be published in the Huffington Post soon and then I’ll link to them here in the Tomversation blog.

I also am ready to start publishing my comic panel, Tomversation, daily. I’m just waiting for the platform to be completed where I’ll publish on that platform along with Facebook.

I’m excited to start doing this daily – drawing comics and writing about them and other art-related things. It’s a nice way to spend the day.

I want to travel more in 2017, I renewed my passport last week. I’m home in Miami now, I do miss New York but not in this snow and cold, I prefer Spring, Summer and Fall up north. I think a lot about Hoboken. I’m imagining being high in a condo, overlooking the Hudson River and New York City, venturing out to a small coffee shop or cafe for lunch, cartooning in between. There is something that draws me to Hoboken. I don’t know what it is.

Interviewing cartoonists

I’m getting ready for daily publication of my Tomversation panel. I am sorry for the delay, I know I was going to start January 1, but along with my daily updates on Facebook, I will start publishing at my old page on GoComics.

Speaking of GoComics, I reached out to a few of the newer cartoonists, whose work I really enjoy and I asked them to do 10 With Tom and they all agreed. And they were all so humble and nice. They have such great talent and such humility to go with it. A nice combo.

I’ll publish the columns in the Huffington Post first and then link to them here all at once so that one post here has them all and you can just link to the original columns in the Huff Post if you care to read them.

When I think about it, the cartoonists are really a very nice crowd. When I interviewed Dilbert’s Scott Adams and Pearls With Swine’s Stephan Pastis, they being the top of the top in the field were still just as nice.

I guess when you’re surrounded by comics and comedy all day, how can you not be in a good mood and be friendly?

GoComics newbies

I’ve taken to reading GoComics again. I had taken a break for a couple of years. I like these newbies that I see there now.

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Amanda the Great reminds me of Hark A Vagrant and that genre of webcomic.

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Wallace the Brave has a Cul de Sac feel. It’s drawn so greatly and it’s funny.

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I love the look and feel of The Sunshine Club. It reminds me so much of the old Eek & Meek comic and now I know why, Howie Schneider, the cartoonist was Eek & Mee’s cartoonist! Eek & Meek were mice and then they turned into people or vice versa, I don’t remember, but I loved reading it. The Sunshine Club is rerun, since Howie passed away a few years back. We used to get it in the Homestead News Leader in Miami.

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Next Door Neighbors is clever and I love the drawing style.

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It’s not new, it’s old, and that’s what I love about Mutt & Jeff on GoComics.

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I like the drawing style and the gags in G-Man Webcomics.

The Brooklyn Daily Eagle

I found this cool site, the Brooklyn Newsstand by the Brooklyn Public Library where you can see all of the Brooklyn Daily Eagle’s issues from 1841 through 1955. I was randomly reading something online and one thing lead to another and this site appeared.

I love reading old newspapers and this seems to be complete. The newspapers from the 1800s are a bit boring, as they are usually about four pages long with small type and boring stories, but as you go on from the 1900s and on, it gets quite interesting.

The first thing I always look for in old newspapers is the comics section and they had quite a few good comics from Mary Worth, Steve Roper to the Bumble Family.

You can look through some interesting old stories and advertisements. Look up any date and it’s there – the Titanic sinking, World War I and II, presidential races . . . whatever.

Of course there are many other sites with old newspapers, but for some reason, I don’t know why, I have always been fascinated by the Brooklyn Eagle. I read that it was once the largest daily afternoon newspaper in the country and perhaps I like it because I picture my parents and grandparents reading it during its heyday since their whole life was Brooklyn at that period. Sort of like the L train (I did a story on that here called “Ghosts of the L Train“).

The name Brooklyn Daily Eagle went into public domain and now is being used as a new digital version of the Eagle. You can see that here.

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Friday, July 5, 1946

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Tuesday, April 5, 1927

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Monday, July 7, 1924

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Saturday, June 8, 1935