Fall in Central Park

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I have been busy, pumping out Hal and High Water strips. I’m almost ready to send them in to the syndicate. I’m going to NY at the end of the week for Thanksgiving week, so I hope to have the strips submitted by then.

I found this photo from last year. It’s the Bow Bridge in Central Park. You can’t see him him very well, but at the very end of the bridge is a guy playing an instrument. He’s all in black, see him just before you enter the bridge? I think it was a flute or a saxophone, I can’t remember. What I do remember is that I was trying to take a short video of him to put on Instagram and he kept turning his back to me. At first I thought it was coincidence, but then I realized, he didn’t want to be taped.

I usually tip these street/park musicians, especially when I take pictures or tape them, but I didn’t in this instance. So I never got him playing, but you can imagine being on the other side of the bridge and hearing his music in the distance, which brings me to this next photo.

This is incredible; the photo, but the experience.

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It was November 2015. I was in Central Park and saw this view in front of me. Amazing. As I sat there on a park bench, I heard Adele singing “Hello” faintly in the distance. It almost sounded like angels! I looked around and didn’t see anyone. “Hello” was released a month before, in October 2015, so it was played all over. So to hear it in the park was strange, but not so strange, but the strange part was hearing it in the distance on a cool Autumn day, with this beautiful scene before me, with no other people around.

After I took the picture and was leaving, as I turned a bend on the path, there was a hot dog vendor with his radio blaring “Hello.” That’s where it was coming from, wafting through the park. Sort of disappointing at that moment, knowing where Adele was coming from!

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The instruments of rock stars

I’m looking forward to a new exhibit opening at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in NYC – it’s called “Play It Loud.” It features instruments played by famous people from famous songs. This video above is CBS Sunday Morning’s story on the exhibit.

Electric guitars, drums and amplifiers are featured. Jerry Lee Lewis’ piano is there, so is Keith Moon’s drum set and Chuck Berry’s Gibson guitar that he played Johnny B. Goode on, which still includes the traveling tags on the guitar case. There is John Lennon’s 12-string Rickenbacker and the drum set Ringo used on the Ed Sullivan Show in 1964.

The Rock & Roll Hall of Fame coordinated the exhibit and will present approximately 130 instruments alongside posters and costumes.

The exhibit runs from April 8 to October 1, 2019.

This video below is Don Felder playing Hotel California at the Met on his original double neck guitar.

The Peanuts gang singing

Here are a couple of great videos of the Peanuts gang performing famous songs. This is so good. The one above is “La Grange” by ZZ Top and the one below is Queen’s “Bohemian Rhapsody” and below that is “Barracuda” by Heart.

You can see a bunch of them here, at YouTube.

Fun art weekend


Every year on President’s Day Weekend, we have the Coconut Grove Arts Festival and St. Stephen’s Art Show in our town. It’s 3-day weekend of art, music, fun and friends.

One of my favorite things on Sunday was Lime, the group from the 1980s, one of my favorites. I had forgotten about so many of their songs which defined my youth.

A few friends and I were standing near the park and all of a sudden, Lime starts performing, that’s the video above I ran right over. They sang all their hits, “Babe We’re Gonna Love Tonight,” “Guilty,” “Unexpected Lovers” and more. So great.

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Is it live or is it Memorex?

25498421_1600075113416938_5282992848606003044_nThis old Memorex ad reminded me of high school. We had an English class called Rock Poetry and we discussed the lyrics and poetry of current rock music. It was a nice class.

The teacher didn’t know much about current music I think because one day she started pulling out cassette tapes that we had brought in (yes, cassettes) and asked, “What should we listen to next? The Beatles? Carol King? The Bee Gees? Memorex?

And we all laughed, and said, No! Memorex is the name of the cassette tape company!” It was so many years ago, but I remember that as if it was yesterday.

There was also this Maxell ad. Remember? It ran all over the place for years. il_570xN.1327002678_3dve

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I did a comic using my character Tombo the Rabbit doing the bit a few years ago.

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Deli worker with a special voice

I’m sure you saw this all over the news. A 23-year-old deli clerk named Guilherme Assuncao who works at Russo’s supermarket in Watertown, Massachusetts was doing a sound check at the store and this happened. He was a singer in Brazil. I don’t think he’ll be serving deli for much longer. Do you?

These are two of my favorite songs. He is amazing. And so humble.

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Where do you go to my lovely

I saw two great movies yesterday – Mama Mia, which I saw so many times on tv and I think two or three times in the theater when it came out in 2008. And the Absolutely Fabulous movie. I had never seen that before. I enjoyed that.

At the very end of AbFab, during the credits, they play this song that I loved, I looked it up. It’s called, “Where Do You Go To My Lovely,” it’s by Peter Sarstedt.


The lyrics are so great. It was released in 1969 and hit number one in the UK, where it stayed for four weeks. It only hit number 61 in the US, which is surprising.

It’s about a girl named Marie Claire who grew up in poverty in Naples, Italy and then became the height of jet set society, speaking many languages, jetting around the world, being the “it” girl. People thought it was about Sofia Loren because she grew up in poverty in Italy and became a famous jet setter, but Sarstedt claimed he had no one in mind when he wrote the song. Year’s later he claimed it was about his wife.

Mama Mia always makes me feel sort of how the Sarstedt song does – melancholy. Not because of the story, but because of the music. The Abba songs being back so many wonderful memories, starting, I think when I was in junior high school. When I hear the song “Waterloo,” I can picture myself in my mother’s car, with the song playing on the radio, like it was yesterday. That song was released in 1974, so it was 1974 I am remembering.

Other songs from later years remind me of being out in the clubs, when I was young and it was my first experience going out, so the memories are special for that reason. So as I listen to the songs in Mama Mia, I can almost remember where I was during certain periods of my younger life, it’s like going back in time. It’s exactly in my head like one of the Abba songs in the movie, Slipping through my fingers, which says, “Sometimes I wish that I could freeze the picture, And save it from the funny tricks of time.” When I hear the music in the movie, I can almost see a photograph in my mind of that time period. Weird.